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It's been said that education is an act of war waged against the young.

The future is not created by us, but by those who inhabit it; by those for whom it is not the future anymore, but the present. As such, there is absolutely no such thing as inevitability as long as there is a willingness to contemplate what is happening in the present.

There is a great demand for what you could call the "tips 'n' tricks" style of teaching. The student asks, "teach me how to use this tool or medium so that when I graduate I can get a job creating content." But we live in a world where half the things someone knows at 20 are no longer true at 40 - and half the things they know at 40 hadn't been discovered when they were 20. Is it fair to let students sleepwalk into the future, unequipped to cope with change for which they themselves will be ultimately responsible?

Young people will have to make their own future. It would be folly to teach them the tools of the past with the expectation that they will always be the standard tools, because "if it works, it's obsolete." I teach tools, techniques and repertoire only as a way to inspire students to come up with new ideas and new ways of thinking. I try hard not to give students the illusion that I am "preparing them for the workplace," since the workplace as it exists today might not be there in 5 years. And as McLuhan observed, “Our Age of Anxiety is the result of trying to do today’s jobs with yesterday’s tools.”

Education should be about discovery instead of instruction; exploration instead of explanation. Because “once you see the boundaries of your environment, they are no longer the boundaries of your environment.”

▶︎ Press Photo By Mirjana Rukavina